About me.

I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers-University Camden. My research broadly focuses on community development, environmental justice, and urban inequality. My research is currently focused along two lines of inquiry:

First, what factors are driving urban inequality? How are low-income residents and communities impacted?

Second, what tools and strategies promote equitable, sustainable and just cities?

I take a social scientific approach to my research, primarily employing qualitative methods. My research has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including the Annals of the American Association of Geographers, the Journal of the American Planning Association, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, Planning Theory, and the Journal of Planning Literature.

I earned my Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Development from the Price School of Public Policy at USC. My research has been supported by the John Randolph Haynes Foundation, the Labor Research and Action Network, the Judith and John Bedrosian Center at USC, and the Lusk Center at USC.

I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers-University Camden. My research broadly focuses on community development, environmental justice, and urban inequality.

My research is currently focused along two lines of inquiry:

First, what factors are driving urban inequality? How are low-income residents and communities impacted?

Second, what tools and strategies promote equitable, sustainable and just cities?

Addressing the second question, I study negotiated community benefits as a community development strategy. My book manuscript, Left at the Table: The Fight for Community Benefits, is under contract with the The University of Pennsylvania Press. The book project builds four case studies, in Los Angeles, Atlanta, Seattle and Milwaukee, to examine whether and how negotiated community benefits improve urban development processes and outcomes.

My research has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including the Annals of the American Association of Geographers, the Journal of the American Planning Association, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, Planning Theory, and the Journal of Planning Literature.

I earned my Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Development from the Price School of Public Policy at USC. My research has been supported by the John Randolph Haynes Foundation, the Labor Research and Action Network, the Judith and John Bedrosian Center at USC, and the Lusk Center at USC.